The Miracles of Jesus Lesson 06 – The Blind Can Now See

Jesus performed many miracles while He was on earth.  One of the most dramatic miracles was healing the blind.  Blindness was an especially debilitating disability in the days of Jesus, as the blind could do nothing more than beg and depend on the generosity of others.  There are many stories in the Gospels of Jesus curing blindness.  Interestingly, Jesus did not always perform this miracle the same way.  Is there a reason for this?

Let’s read together Psalms 146:8; Isaiah 29:18, 35:5; 42:7, 16, 18.

Jesus healed the blind to show the world He is the Messiah spoken of in the Old Testament prophecies. Let’s look at several stories of Jesus curing blindness.

Let’s read together Matthew 9:27-31.

Two blind men cried out to Jesus asking for healing.  He asked them if they believed he could heal their eyes.  They said yes.  Jesus then touched their eyes and healed them of their blindness.

Let’s read together Matthew 12:22-32.

Jesus healed a demon-possessed blind and mute man.  The Pharisees accused Jesus of casting demons out by the power of Satan.  Jesus rebuked the Pharisees for their unbelief.

Let’s read together Mark 8:22-26.

Jesus healed a blind man at Bethsaida.  Jesus spit on the man’s eyes and asked what the man saw.  The man replied he had vision, but it was distorted. Jesus then put his hands on the man’s eyes and asked him to look up.  The man’s vision was completely restored.

Let’s read together John 9:1-41.

Jesus healed a man who was blind from birth.  Jesus made a salve with clay and His spit.  He anointed the man’s eyes and told him to wash in the pool of Siloam. The man did as Jesus asked.  After he washed in the pool of Siloam, his eyesight was restored.

Let’s read together Mark 10:46-52.

Blind Bartimaeus called after Jesus, begging for healing.  Even though people told him to be quiet, Bartimaeus called out even louder. Jesus stopped and asked Bartimaeus what he wanted.  Bartimaeus ask Jesus to restore his sight.  Jesus told Bartimaeus his faith in Jesus has made him well.  Bartimaeus immediately received his sight.

When we read these stories as a whole, we see Jesus does not use a “one-size-fits-all” strategy to heal the blind.  He treats each person as individuals and meets them where they are.  

Jesus healed the two blind men by touching their eyes after they proclaimed their belief in him.  

Jesus healed the demon-possessed blind and mute man as an object lesson to the Pharisees.  The Pharisees saw the miracle with their own eyes, yet still refused to believe in Jesus.  They were as spiritually blind as the man was physically blind.  The difference between them was the Pharisees refused to be healed (Matthew 23:13-36).

Why did it seemingly take two attempts to heal the blind man at Bethsaida?  We know from the Scriptures Jesus is perfect.  Jesus did not make a mistake.  Jesus saw fit in this case to heal the man in two stages.  Perhaps the reason had to do with the man’s lack of faith. Sometimes we need a little time to process new spiritual insight.  When the man was able to partially see, his faith in Jesus increased.  Jesus then restored his sight completely.

Jesus took His time to heal the man who was blind from birth.  Making an eye salve out of clay and saliva parallels God’s act of creating man from the dust of the ground at Creation (Genesis 2:7).  The man testified what Jesus did for him and would not bow to pressure from the Pharisees to say Jesus was not the Christ.

Jesus healed Bartimaeus without ever touching him.  Bar means “son of,” so we do not really even know this man’s name.  He is simply referred to as the son of Timaeus. Bartimaeus’ faith in Jesus was so strong, Jesus healed him by simply saying the word.

If you are suffering in life, there may be greater meaning in your illness or struggle.  Even if you do not receive the healing or answers you seek, stay strong and continually seek after Christ in faith.

Friend, will you open your eyes to the fact that Jesus is your Messiah?

Advertisement

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s